October 1981, Volume 31, Issue 10

News and Notes

CLINICAL CYTOPATHOLOGY FOR PATHOLOGISTS A POSTGRADUATE COURSE

The Twenty-third Postgraduate Course for Pathologists in Clinical Cytopathology is to be given at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, March 22-April 2, 1982. The full two week program is designed for pathologists who are Certified (or qualified) by the American Board of Pathology (PA), on its international equivalent.
It will provide an intensive refresher in all aspects of the field of Clinical Cytopathology, with time devoted to newer techniques, special problems, and recent applications. Topics will be covered in lectures, explored in small informal conferences, and discussed over the microscope with the Faculty. Self-instructional material will be available to augment at individual pace. A loan set of slides with text will be sent to each participant for home-study during February and March by the Institute. Credit hours 125 in AMA Category 1.
The entire course is given in English.
Application is to be made before January 27, 1982. For details, write:
John K. Frost M.D. 610 Pathology Building, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, U.S.A.
TENTH WORLD CONFERENCE ON GENERAL PRACTICE
Venue: Singapore.  Date: 20 to 20 May 1983.
Contact: College of General Practitioners Singapore, 4A College Road SINGAPORE 0316.
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF FAMILY PHYSICIANS
Annual Scientific Assemblies
October 4-7 1982
Brooks Hall San Francisco
October 10-13, 1983
Miami Beach Convention Centre,
Miami Beach, Florida
October 8-11, 1984
Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Missouri.
ILO CONVENTION ON MAKING WORKPLACES HEALTHIER
New international labour standards to make the workplace safer\'and healthier were adopted by the International Labour Conference which ended its 67th session in Geneva on June 24.
Comprising nearly 1,900 government, employer and worker delegates and advisers from 137 countries-a record attendancethe three-week session encouraged the ILO "to pursue unswervingly the struggle for human rights, employment and social justice".
President of the Conference was Mr. Alioune Diagne, Senegal\'s Minister of Public Service, Employment and Labour. Vice-Presidents were Mr. Gennadi Jossifovitch Oudoyenko (Ukarine: government), Mr. Haracio Guillermo Villalobos (Venezuela: employer) and Mr. Frank L. Walcott (Barbadods workers).
INSTITUTE FOR HEARING AND SPEECH DISORDERS
The Government is planning to set up a National Institute for Hearing and Speech Disorder in Children to extend treatment to disabled persons in the country in observance of the International Year of the Disabled.
In pursuance of the United Nations resolution and the President\'s directive, this Institute would not only provide hearing aids and requed treatments but the facilities of training and research on the diseases causing handicaps will be available at the institute.
The Institute would later manufacture various kinds of equipment and other assistance for hearing and speech disorders. In this regard the former British Minister for the Disabled and now an MP, Mr. Alfred Morris and Prof. Peter Mittland, a research scholar of University of Manchester, have agreed to extend their guidance and cooperation he added.
AN ANTIGEN TEST FOR MALARIA
A new test for malaria that is far more sensitive than the present method of examining a blood film and which will allow wide-scale screening has been developed at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
The test involves of a reference serum containing malaria antigen from in vitro cultures of the Plasmodium. This* is reacted with serum from a suspected patient using a radioactive iodine marker.
Testing for the antigen is a spin-off of the ability to culture the Plasmodium in vitro in human red cells, which has only been possible since 1976, says Dr. David Warhurst, a pro-tozoologist at the Malaria Laboratory, School of hygience and Tropical Medicine, London.
ANTI-CLOTTING DRUG SLOWS SPREAD OF LUNG CANCER
A drug that prevents clothing of the blood can slow the growth and spread of cancer, says a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
A Veterans Administration Co-operative study tested the premise that warfarin sodium, an anti-clotting drug, would modify the course of cancer.
The warfarin sodium was added to the treatment program of drugs plus radiotherapy for 25 patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung. These individuals had a median survival time of 50 weeks. A control group of another 25 individuals with the same type of cancer who received drug and radiation therapy without the anticoagulant recorded a median survival time of 24 weeks.
SMALLER BABIES FOR THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
An estimated 21 million babies born throughout the world in 1979 were of "low birth weight", weighing 2,500 grams (5 lbs. 8 oz.) or less, according to a first, comprehensive review of available evidence of the problem on a global scale.
The "vast majority"-over 19 million or 90 per cent-of those births took place in the developing world.
The infants of low birth weight constituted 17 per cent of the 122 million live births worldwide that year.
"At the global level", a report in the current issue of WHO\'s statistical quarterly says, "this means that about one in every six infants has low birth weight, but the incidence is not evenlyspread around the globe. In some parts of Asia the ration is one in two, while in parts of Europe it is only one in seventeen.

Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association has agreed to receive and publish manuscripts in accordance with the principles of the following committees: